Supporting Teeth

Bone Regeneration

When a tooth is lost, both bone and gum tissue compete for the vacant space. The gum tissue generates more quickly than bone, subsequently occupying the space. With a membrane placement we can keep the gum tissue from invading the space, which will ideally give the bone sufficient time to regenerate. Bone regeneration is often used to rebuild the supporting structures around the teeth, which have been destroyed by periodontal disease. Bone surgery may be used to attempt to rebuild or reshape bone. Grafts of the patient's bone or artificial bone may be used, as well as special membranes.

Sinus Bump

The human skull has several cavities or air spaces called sinuses. When the sinus is enlarged and intrudes on areas where we want to place dental implants, bone or bone growth stimulation material is placed into the sinus. This procedure only affects the maxillary sinuses, which are located just over the molar teeth in the upper jaw. The side of the maxillary sinus is opened and the bottom is raised so it will fill in with bone. Several months later, dental implants can be placed in solid bone.

An "Osteotome Lift" is a surgical procedure that raises the floor of the sinus directly over where the implant is placed. This can be done without actually opening the sinus.

Soft Tissue Grafting

Root exposure resulting from gingival tissue recession may pose multiple problems for patients:

  • Undesirable Aesthetics
  • Root Sensitivity
  • Impaired Oral Hygiene
  • Increased Caries Susceptibility
  • Teeth May Become Loose

A gingival tissue graft will restore the proper gum tissue structure around the tooth.

Laser Pocket Disinfection (LPD)

A Cleaner, Healthier Mouth
  • Kills bacteria and disrupts biofilm to reduce inflammation
  • No shots needed
  • Maintain healthy gums and avoid progression of gum disease
  • No antibiotics needed, avoids antibiotic resistance
  • The laser light can reach and destroy bacteria up to 6mm beyond the surface to help prevent bacteria from spreading back into the pocket
  • Safe for medically compromised patients, those on blood thinners, or those with diabetes
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Frequently Asked Questions About LPD

How Will LPD Help Me?

By removing the inflammation, your body has the energy to heal naturally. The laser light kills bacteria and creates a clean environment for healing.

Am I A Candidate For LPD?

If you have gingivitis, LPD can help reverse symptoms. LPD can also be used to treat patients on a perio-maintence program.

Does LPD Hurt?

Not at all! LPD is a quick and painless. If you are very sensitive, a topical anesthetic may be used.

Are There Any Side Effects?

There are no known side-effects of LPD in over 25 years of therapy, just bigger smiles. The treatment is safe for use around crowns, bridges, sealants, and implants.

I'm About To Have Surgery. Should I Have LPD?

LPD is beneficial to patients who have recently has surgery, or are scheduled to have surgery to reduce bacteria that may enter the bloodstream.

Why Do I Need To treat Gum Disease?

Gum disease has been linked to serious health concerns including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, pre-term birth, certain cancers & more.

Book an Appointment with Us

Here at Fallbrook Mission Dental, we are committed to providing general dental care and to creating beautiful smiles for you and your family. We offer emergency care and evening on-call hours for patients of record who cannot wait until the next business day. Schedule an appointment by filling out our online form calling us.